The present document can't read!
Please download to view
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
...

Jake Glavis - The Great New Green Building Material Is…Wood?

by jake-glavis

on

Report

Category:

Design

Download: 0

Comment: 0

39

views

Comments

Description

A recent article on The Conversation has made the argument that of all the major building materials - concrete, brick, aluminum, steel - wood is by far the most green. The article’s author, Chad Oliver is the Pinchot Professor of Forestry and Environmental Studies, and Director of Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry at Yale University, admits that his conclusion may be counter-intuitive, but insists the evidence is there.

The modern building materials that we employ each year are energy intensive to produce and account for 16% of the fuel production for the entire planet. Wood is renewable and only requires a portion of the world’s forestry resources.
Download Jake Glavis - The Great New Green Building Material Is…Wood?

Transcript

  • 1. The Great New GreenBuilding Material Is…Wood?By Jake Glavis
  • 2. • A recent article on TheConversation has made theargument that of all the majorbuilding materials - concrete,brick, aluminum, steel - woodis by far the most green. Thearticle’s author, Chad Oliver isthe Pinchot Professor ofForestry and EnvironmentalStudies, and Director of GlobalInstitute of SustainableForestry at Yale University,admits that his conclusion maybe counter-intuitive, but insiststhe evidence is there.
  • 3. !• The modern building materials that we employ each year areenergy intensive to produce and account for 16% of the fuelproduction for the entire planet. Wood is renewable and onlyrequires a portion of the world’s forestry resources.!• Oliver cites his research published in the Journal of SustainableForestry. They estimate that the world’s forest contain 385 billioncubic meters of wood with an additional 17 billion cubic metersgrowing every year. Oliver argues that with a 3.4 billion cubicmeters harvested each year, mostly for fuel, that other buildingproducts for wood would make for renewable building that wouldnot harm biodiversity if done correctly.
  • 4. • Oliver and his team of researchers haveevaluated scenarios in which wood is burned forenergy, used for construction, or forests are leftuntouched. What they found was that the woodharvested each year accounts for only 20% ofnew annual growth. Increasing the wood harvestby 14% and creating less concrete and steelwould reduce global CO2 by 14-31% and anannual of 12-19% of fossil fuel consumptionwould be saved.
  • 5. • Harvesting forests for wood production only temporarilydisrupts a forest ecosystem, and would ultimately serve topreserve the forest as a precious natural resource. Placingemphasis on wood for construction would help to preserveforests and end the practice of clear cutting andconverting the area to farmland. Oliver notes that newstyles of building construction, such as cross-laminatedtinder, have overcome some of the barriers of working withwood, making it a viable and green alternative totraditional modern materials.!• To read the original article, head over to The Conversation.
  • Fly UP
    loading...